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Bladder Control Background

Storage lower urinary tract (LUTS) include overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms of increased day frequency, nocturia (getting out of bed for the toilet), urinary urgency, or having to rush for the restroom and urgency urinary incontinence, as well as stress urinary incontinence. Up to 50 million Americans, both men and women, are affected. Research in other countries cite a comparable prevalence.

Bladder Control Background

Storage lower urinary tract (LUTS) include overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms of increased day frequency, nocturia (getting out of bed for the toilet), urinary urgency, or having to rush for the restroom and urgency urinary incontinence, as well as stress urinary incontinence. Up to 50 million Americans, both men and women, are affected. Research in other countries cite a comparable prevalence.

A 64-year old woman has incontinence so embarrassing that she won’t leave her home. A 55 year old man can’t find the motivation for work, socializing or intimacy. A 70-year old man is fatigued in the day as a result of getting up for the toilet several times a night.

We have addressed and will continue to address critical health issues like these, so someone can join her husband for an evening out, someone can maintain an intimate relationship or play football with his sons or golf with friends, and someone can laugh with and enjoy her grandchildren.

The major bladder control concerns or LUTS (Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms) include overactive bladder (OAB), a term that was only coined by the International Continence Society in 2002, and urinary incontinence (UI). The cause of overactive bladder is unclear but may be associated with overactivity of the detrusor muscle. OAB includes symptoms of urinary urgency, or having to rush for the restroom with little or no warning, as well as, increased urinary frequency of more than 8 urinations per 24 hour period, nocturia (getting out of bed at night to empty the bladder), and urgency urinary incontinence if the individual doesn’t make it to the toilet in time. OAB affects men and women relatively equally at approximately 12% of the population.

Stress urinary incontinence affects more women and is typically the result of weakened pelvic floor muscles due to pressure being placed on the pelvic floor due to, for example, pregnancy, obesity, constipation. A history of hysterectomy, prostatectomy or prolapse repair is also linked with stress UI.

With stress UI, there is little to no warning resulting in an increased likelihood of bladder accidents or involuntary urine loss. In addition, many sufferers experience mixed incontinence, a combination of both stress and urge incontinence.

One in three women who have given birth experience stress incontinence.  Combined, stress and urgency urinary incontinence affects approximately 25% of reproductive age women, 50% of post-menopausal women, and 50%-75% of women in nursing homes. Despite this, UI remains under-diagnosed and underreported.

Many with poor bladder control cope by using adult diapers or padded underwear and make significant lifestyle changes, such as, wearing black on the lower half to hide evidence of accidents; taking the table in restaurants near the restrooms or sitting near the exit at movies for a quick escape; stopping exercise due to accidents.

Bladder weakness can be debilitating to mobility and socializing, key factors often attributed to longevity, by limiting travel for more than one hour at a time due to the need for a restroom; not staying overnight at family and friends so as not to disturb them with the overnight toilet visits; stopping exercise due to accidents, the list goes on.  Sufferers may mistakenly reduce liquid intake, risking dehydration, which further irritates the bladder.

One in three women who have given birth experience stress incontinence.  Combined, stress and urgency urinary incontinence affects approximately 25% of reproductive age women, 50% of post-menopausal women, and 50%-75% of women in nursing homes. Despite this, UI remains under-diagnosed and underreported.

Many with poor bladder control cope by using adult diapers or padded underwear and make significant lifestyle changes, such as, wearing black on the lower half to hide evidence of accidents; taking the table in restaurants near the restrooms or sitting near the exit at movies for a quick escape; stopping exercise due to accidents.

Bladder weakness can be debilitating to mobility and socializing, key factors often attributed to longevity, by limiting travel for more than one hour at a time due to the need for a restroom; not staying overnight at family and friends so as not to disturb them with the overnight toilet visits; stopping exercise due to accidents, the list goes on.  Sufferers may mistakenly reduce liquid intake, risking dehydration, which further irritates the bladder.

More active Baby Boomers are demanding treatments for UI, although social stigma still prevents treatment of a majority of sufferers.  It is estimated that only 33% of sufferers have been diagnosed.

According to The Simon Foundation and The National Association for Continence, ⅓ of mature adults and  ½ of older adults (men and women equally) of all cultures, suffer incontinence. One in five adults (20%) experience Overactive Bladder symptoms.  The US is not alone. A 2002 study of 5 other western countries (i.e., Canada, Germany, Italy, Sweden and the United Kingdom) shows on average, OAB prevalence was around 12% and UI 9%.

Previous and emerging clinical research into the use of phytomedicines demonstrates an increasing benefit from these approaches, often without the side effects that are associated with prescription medications. However, few have been subjected to controlled clinical trials to evaluate their safety and efficacy. Earlier research with Crateva alone, Crateva and Equisteum combined and pilot research with Urox (Crateva, Equisetum and Lindera) has consistently shown the benefit of these herbs and their combination.

The efficacy of Urox is considered to be due to an antispasmodic effect as a result of an improvement in the tone of the bladder muscles and underlying pelvic floor muscles.

Bladder Control Background

Storage lower urinary tract (LUTS) include overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms of increased day frequency...
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Clinical Trials

Research has been the foundation of the 20-year evolution of Urox and Seipel Group culminating with the latest randomized, placebo-controlled clinical study published January 2018...
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Conclusions

This study demonstrated significant efficacy and tolerability of the phytomedicine formula, Urox, in the treatment of UI and symptoms of OAB....
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Patents

This study demonstrated significant efficacy and tolerability of the phytomedicine formula, Urox, in the treatment of UI and symptoms of OAB....
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